Welcome

During the latter part of the 20th century and beginning of the 21st century, the National Park Service (NPS) engaged in an historic effort to coordinate a massive undertaking of bringing together entities from Tribal, national, state, regional, and local communities during the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Commemoration, Corps of Discovery II: 200 Years to the Future. The timeless contributions of NPS personnel were instrumental in making sure that our nation had the opportunity to hear the voices of American Indian people telling their stories in the Tent of Many Voices throughout the Bicentennial commemoration and enjoy the sincere effort extended by hundreds of “good people” along the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail during the commemoration. Presentations made in the Tent of Many Voices and the publication, Enough Good People: Reflections on Tribal Involvement and Inter-cultural Collaboration 2003-2006, can be found at: http://www.lc-triballegacy.org. Not wanting such a monumental achievement to go dormant, the bold and courageous commitment of the National Park Service’s Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail over the last ten years led directly to Honoring Tribal Legacies: An Epic Journey of Healing. The rationale for Honoring Tribal Legacies is that what was so very potent and vital in the past still rings true in the present and, more importantly, to our collective futures as a nation. The Honoring Tribal Legacies website was designed and developed to encourage educators at all levels and in every environment to benefit from the collective wisdom that can be gained from a shared history that simultaneously embraces the past, present, and future.In this virtual Handbook, you will find rigorous high quality demonstration curricula spanning all grade levels as well as two essential volumes. Volume I – Foundation Document for Honoring Tribal Legacies: An Epic Journey of Healing answers the question, “Why design curriculum Honoring Tribal Legacies?” Volume II – Guide to Designing Curriculum for Honoring Tribal Legacies: An Epic Journey of Healing answers the question, “How does one design curriculum Honoring Tribal Legacies?”

Download

Foundation Document for Honoring Tribal Legacies

Volume I

Vision, by CHiXapkaid, Stephanie Wood, and Ella Inglebret

Chapter One

Spirit and Vision: Honoring What Has Been Accomplished, by Jill Hamilton-Anderson, Richard Basch, and Carol McBryant

Chapter Two

Honoring Native Memory: Potent and Vital in the Past, Present, and Future, by Stephanie Wood

Chapter Three

Exploring the Deep Meaning of Place Names along the Lewis and Clark Trail, by Shane Doyle, James Walker, Ryan Cooper, and Stephanie Wood

Chapter Four

“With Utmost Good Faith”: Cultivating Sustainable Relationships between Tribes and other Stakeholders, by Mike Jetty, Tom Ball, Ella Inglebret, and CHiXapkaid

Chapter Five

Coming Full Circle, by Stephanie Wood, Ella Inglebret, CHiXapkaid, and Jill Hamilton-Anderson

Guide to Designing Curriculum for Honoring Tribal Legacies

Volume II

Introduction, by CHiXapkaid, Ella Inglebret, and Stephanie Wood

Chapter One

Curricular Schema and Curriculum Expressions, by Megkian Doyle, Ella Inglebret, and CHiXapkaid

Chapter Two

Place-Based Multiliteracies Framework, by Ella Inglebret and CHiXapkaid

Chapter Three

Differentiated Instruction, by Ella Inglebret, Susan Rae Banks-Joseph, and CHiXapkaid

Chapter Four

Primary Sources for American Indian Research, by Carol Anne Buswell

Chapter Five

The Art of Learning: Cradle to College and Beyond, by Luisa Sanchez-Nilsen and David Conley

Chapter Six

Collecting More than Evidence: Graduating from High School in Washington State Using Culturally Responsive Tasks to Show Reading, Writing, and Mathematical Skills, by Amanda Mount and Leslie Klenk

Epilogue, by Stephanie Wood, CHiXapkaid, and Ella Inglebret